The Recycle Bin

Renewable Living includes dealing constructively with material objects that are no longer needed. When you live "off the grid" and strive for extreme efficiency, you accumulate some unusual hardware that doesn't have any obvious use to most people. Even the obsolete computer equipment in my collection is unconventional. Like the rest of this site, the "Recycle Bin" page is my effort to connect with the rare individual who might have use for some of what I've collected.

Unless specifically noted, everything listed here is available "free to a good home" - totally free if you come pick it up, or delivered to you for the cost of packing and shipping. Everything is located on a rural ridgetop near Philo, California, USA. Obviously some of the items are not reasonably shippable and would require you to come here with a truck.

If you think you might have the slightest interest in any of these objects, please eMail me: loren (symbol) pacific (punctuation) net



Clicking one of the Item Headers below will scroll you down to a detailed description lower on this page.


Free: Used Jack Pump System (old-fashioned windmill style)

Includes 8 sticks (160') of 2" galvanized pipe,
the red Monitor hand pump and accessories,
and some serious speed reducer and right-angle gearboxes.


Free: Unused Ergomax E65 Heat Exchanger Tank (with tiny leak in an internal coil)

This is the newer, shorter, square-cased model,
a 65 gallon vertical plain steel tank
with five 50' coils of copper tubing inside.


Free: Three 4x10' Solar Hot Water Collectors (with internal mineral deposits)

Aluminum and glass cased flat-panel collectors,
no longer good for full flow pressurized use,
but good for gravity flow or replacement panels.


Free: Apple CD-SC (the original computer CD reader)

Large, heavy, standalone device reads original 1x CD format
using 25-pin SCSI connection; also plays audio CDs
through a pair of RCA jacks. Two (required) disc caddys included.




Free: Used Jack Pump System (old-fashioned windmill style)

This was my water supply for twenty years. If the original installer had used a dielectric union between the steel pipe and the brass cylinder at the bottom of the well, it might still be in use. Instead, a tiny hole eroded through the steel, just above the junction, requiring the whole assembly to be pulled out. I elected to replace it with a soft-start, remote speed controllable Grundfos SQE, that I can pull out by hand. (Also discovered that the nagging rust problem in the water from the old system was entirely due to the threaded insides of the galvanized couplings connecting the pipe sections. If you ever do a steel pipe well, use stainless couplings as well as dielectric unions!)

Eight 21' sticks of 2" galvanized iron pipe
one nastily rusted, with the tiny hole
one visibly rusted but solid
five almost like new, with threads on both ends
one almost like new, with 4" sawn off of one end

Nine sticks of apitong wood well rod with 5/8-11 iron couplers
one ~12' shortened piece
one piece rotted and twisted in two
one good piece cleanly sawed in half
six apparently sound pieces

The red Monitor hand pump
spout with valve, plus 1 1/4" pipe connection

The 1 7/8" x 24" Midland 652 cylinder
cylinder visibly worn but functional
valve seats slightly pitted
leathers half worn...

My homemade pump jack:
Directly connects to NEMA 56C motor
Grove Flexaline 20:1 hollow-shaft right-angle worm gear reducer
(also another spare 20:1 gear reducer)
two 2:1 three-shaft spiral bevel right-angle gearboxes
custom welded mounting frame
keyed crank arms and ball bearing pillow blocks
wood riser arms with Dempster cast crosshead system

Other stuff:
four new "Black Diamond" 1 7/8" leathers
four new Midland plain 1 7/8" leathers
1 1/4 qt Mobil SHC 634 synthetic gear oil

Obviously everything is used, and the jack is one-of-a-kind. It is built from serious industrial equipment that should run indefinitely under the loads it sees, but of course nobody knows because nothing like it has ever existed before. There are no offset or sliding loads (which killed its predecessor), all the forces are symmetrical and balanced. No belts, no exposed gears, just smooth rotation in synthetic gear oil.




Free: Unused Ergomax E65 Heat Exchanger Tank (with tiny leak in an internal coil)

This is an "indirect" water heating device designed to work with hot water boiler systems. The plain steel tank normally contains the same oxygen depleted water that circulates through your boiler, so it doesn't need to be glass or stone lined. The domestic hot water supply runs through five loops of copper tubing inside the tank, and is instantly heated as it passes through. At normal flow rates it ends up only a degree or two below the tank temperature - that's a serious heat exchanger!

Unfortunately this one has a tiny leak between the DHW coils and the boiler water section, which means a continual infiltration of fresh oxygenated water and domestic supply pressure into your lower pressure boiler loop - not good! The leak may be right at the inlet port, where the five copper tubing loops are siamesed into a single 1.5" copper tubing stub by filling the gaps with solder. Or it might be anywhere inside, accessible only by cutting through the steel tank...

This is the newer, shorter, square-cased model,
a 65 gallon vertical plain steel tank
with five 50' coils of copper tubing inside.




Free: Three 4x10' Solar Hot Water Collectors (with internal mineral deposits)

These were used "open-loop" with local very hard water for many years, and the minerals precipitated onto the insides of the small passages at points where the flow rate changed. Eventually a few of the tubes failed to drain in winter and froze. Some were repaired, some just filled back in with minerals and seemed to seal themselves. They have all been pressure tested to 5 psi and showed no leaks, so they would probably work for a gravity-flow system.

Two are "pool collectors" with 1.5" fittings, one is a "DHW" collector with 1" fittings. It seems it is not a good idea to mix the two in the same flow stream, at least with hard water. Actually running open-loop is not a good idea period - anti-freeze rules!

Aluminum and glass cased flat-panel collectors,
no longer good for full flow pressurized use,
but good for gravity flow or replacement panels.




Free: Apple CD-SC (the original computer CD reader)

Probably only interesting to someone with a computer museum, though it worked fine the last time it was tried. Totally amazing how much weight and complexity it used to take to read a CD.

Large, heavy, standalone device reads original 1x CD format
using 25-pin SCSI connection; also plays audio CDs
through a pair of RCA jacks. Two (required) disc caddys included.



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Table of Contents - Text

Revised 10 January 2010